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english

Learn English Tenses: FUTURE – “will” or “going to”? · engVid

Learn English Tenses: FUTURE – “will” or “going to”?

Test your understanding of this English lesson

We use "going to" instead of "will" in formal situations.
Which is correct?
We should use "going to" in an informal situation, when something is decided.
__________. I’m not going to do any work.
The official graduation ceremony __________ at 3:00.
Hey, be careful! That box looks heavy. Please put it down. __________ carry it for you.
She hasn’t decided which job offer to accept. __________ either accept the position with the bank or with the consulting company.
Which is correct?
You know what? I’m too tired to cook dinner tonight. I think __________ some Thai food.
To talk about the future in formal or business situations, it is best to use __________.

Thank you Rebecca for a very interesting lesson.
I got 100%

Wednesday, April 1st 2020

Wednesday, April 1st 2020

Great lesson, thank you very much. It will improve my english for sure.

Wednesday, April 1st 2020

Hi Rebecca! Thank you for fixing my knowledge in simple future tense. I will improve my knowledge further definitely.

Wednesday, April 1st 2020

Thank you Rebecca, I was looking for this topic for a long time.

Wednesday, April 1st 2020

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

I got 8/10 and wrong two questions, I will carefull next time. Thank Rebecca

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

i got 7/10
i’m going to be good.
thanks Rebecca

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

i am very happy to learn informal and formal tenses,very useful

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

This is the best what i’ve seen ! Thanks a lot )

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

thanks Rebecca! I have got 9/10 scores. I’ll try to better.

Thursday, April 2nd 2020

why in question 6 I have to use *I’ll* instead of * I’m going to*?

Friday, April 3rd 2020

Hi Rebbeca, you’re a great teacher! Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

Friday, April 3rd 2020

Thanks a lot Rebecca!!You’re help me to improve more my english

Friday, April 3rd 2020

Im the begginer in english, so for today you have help me a lote.

Thank you

Thank you Teacher Rebecca ,you are the best, I get 10/10 and I´m going to watch and to learn all your lessons

Friday, April 3rd 2020

Thank you Rebecca, I got 100%, this is a helpful lesson.

Saturday, April 4th 2020

Saturday, April 4th 2020

Saturday, April 4th 2020

Saturday, April 4th 2020

Sunday, April 5th 2020

Sunday, April 5th 2020

Tuesday, April 7th 2020

Awesome and Amazing lessons. I got a perfect 10 out of 10. Big help to all who want to improve English grammar. Thanks again, Ma’am.

Wednesday, April 8th 2020

Wednesday, April 8th 2020

Wednesday, April 8th 2020

I’m going to make trains and then probably I’ll drink a glass of juice.

Friday, April 10th 2020

Saturday, April 11th 2020

Learn English for free with 1539 video lessons by experienced native-speaker teachers. Classes cover English grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, IELTS, TOEFL, and more. Join millions of ESL students worldwide who are improving their English every day with engVid.

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Categories
english

Nicole ‘Snooki’ Polizzi Teaches NY Knicks Star Enes Kanter To Speak English

When it was time for Turkish Knicks’ star Enes Kanter to knuckle down and learn the English language, he got help from two very unlikely places. Read on for more information on the basketball player’s crash course

This content was originally published here.

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english

Homeschool The SUPER EASY Way – Learn to Speak English Powerfully With Effortless English

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The perfect complement for the Power Course, because it will teach you how to learn English faster.

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english

Amazon Alexa Gets MyPedia Skill to Help Students Learn English | Technology News

Amazon Alexa has acquired a new MyPedia skill aimed at helping students learn English. The MyPedia skill brought to Alexa by Pearson India can be used by learners of all age groups who want to work on their knowledge and understanding of the English language. MyPedia skill can be used on Amazon Echo smart speakers, Echo Show smart displays, and Alexa app on smartphones. Users will simply have to say “Alexa, open MyPedia”, or “Alexa, I want to learn English” to start learning.

The new MyPedia skill in Alexa can prove to be helpful for the students who are staying at home for longer durations during the ongoing lockdown. MyPedia uses stories, fun facts, trivia, quizzes, and rewards to involve learners in an engaging manner so as to increase their interest in the English language. Learners can benefit from the new skill as it helps them go forward at their own pace and increase their imagination.

“The combination of interactive learning and the simplicity of voice interactions with Alexa will make this a fun experience for users of all age groups”, said Amazon India executive Puneesh Kumar in a statement.

Additionally, MyPedia Reader storybook has also been launched by Pearson on Amazon Kindle. This book has stories by students who have written them on the basis of their own aspirations and experiences. The book is expected to help learners become more imaginative and learn the English language better.

Pearson says on its website that MyPedia is a learning ecosystem aimed at improving the way teachers teach and students learn where they integrating learning tools in a well-designed and scientific manner.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
english

Learn English Grammar: The 4 Conditionals · engVid

Learn English Grammar: The 4 Conditionals

Test your understanding of this English lesson

How many conditional tenses are there in English grammar?
Which of the following is an example of the zero conditional?
Which of the following is an example of the first conditional?
Which of the following is an example of the second conditional?
Which of the following is an example of the third conditional?
If it’s warm and sunny tomorrow, we _____________ swim in the sea. (1st conditional)
If you didn’t eat so much late at night, you __________ sleep better. (2nd conditional)
If he had worked harder at school, he __________ got a place at university. (3rd conditional)
The zero conditional is used for:
The second conditional is used for:

Thanks for the good explanations. All 4 conditionals – important for me to see it on a view. A little strange to use the simple past in the second conditional.

Monday, April 13th 2020

Thanks teacher Gill. I will do my best to the next lesson.

Monday, April 13th 2020

Learn English for free with 1540 video lessons by experienced native-speaker teachers. Classes cover English grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, IELTS, TOEFL, and more. Join millions of ESL students worldwide who are improving their English every day with engVid.

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english

Where Lonely Refugees Learn English From Daytime Soaps – The New York Times

HOW TO PRONOUNCE KNIFE
Stories
By Souvankham Thammavongsa

Today the word “refugee” is practically synonymous with those who have fled the Syrian war and its trail of destitution. But in a different time, in the aftermath of a different war — the one in Vietnam — the term evoked the more than three million people who fled Southeast Asia for a chance at a better life.

Souvankham Thammavongsa, a writer who has published four books of poetry, was born in a refugee camp, to Laotian parents, and raised in Toronto. In “How to Pronounce Knife,” her impressive debut story collection, her family’s arduous, yearslong journey west forms the unspoken back story of the immigrant Laotians who congregate in its pages. Like her own parents, Thammavongsa’s protagonists have lost their place in the world; now, in various unnamed North American cities, they are forced to invent their lives anew.

Thammavongsa’s spare, rigorous stories are preoccupied with themes of alienation and dislocation, her characters burdened by the sense of existing unseen. She sets several stories in the workplace, where noxious hierarchies rooted in race and class reinforce and intensify her characters’ feelings of invisibility. In “Picking Worms,” a woman who has a job on a hog farm collecting worms brings along her daughter and her daughter’s friend James to work alongside her, sharing with them “all the little things that had taken her months and seasons to learn and figure out on her own.” But when the farm’s owner wants someone to take over for him, he makes James the new manager. “And they accuse us of taking their jobs,” the woman says. “Well, you know what? That coulda been my job. My job! … He doesn’t even need the money.” In “Paris,” Red, a quiet loner, works on the line at a chicken processing plant where everyone stationed in the coveted front office has a “thin nose” that sticks out from his or her face and points “upward.”

This content was originally published here.

Categories
english

Most European students learn English in school | Pew Research Center

Students in Europe learn foreign languages in school at a much higher rate than their American counterparts. They also tend to learn more languages throughout their education due to national mandates. Part of this linguistic imbalance may be because most European students are learning English in school, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis.

Across Europe, 91% of students in primary and secondary school were studying English in 2017 – more than all other foreign languages learned combined by a large margin, according to data from Eurostat, the statistics arm of the European Commission. The next-most studied languages in European schools are French, German and Spanish, each garnering no more than 15% of students participating in 2017. Russian, studied in a formal classroom by 2% of Europeans, is the only other foreign language that more than 1% of European students learn.

How we did this

To assess how many students learn English at school in European countries, Pew Research Center analyzed language learning data for 30 nations available via Eurostat, the statistics arm of the European Commission. The data in its raw form is separated within country by three education levels – primary, lower secondary and upper secondary. The analysis combines these levels to allow for analysis across the aggregate. While this post focuses primarily on students learning English in school, the same aggregation methods were used for each language studied in each country where data is available in 2017. The United Kingdom, Ireland and Serbia have incomplete or no data available and were therefore omitted from this analysis.

Data for the United States comes from “The National K-12 Foreign Language Enrollment Survey Report” from the American Councils for International Education, published in June 2017.

Far fewer K-12 students in the U.S. participate in foreign language education than in Europe. Throughout all 50 states and the District of Columbia, 20% of K-12 students are enrolled in foreign language classes, according to a 2017 report from the nonprofit American Councils for International Education.

Many European countries mandate that students study more than one foreign language, so students learning something other than English may also study English simultaneously or at some point in their education.

While English is the most studied foreign language in Europe overall, this varies somewhat across countries. For example, 100% of students in primary and secondary school in Malta, Liechtenstein, Northern Macedonia and Austria studied English in the classroom as of 2017. In 25 out of 29 nations where data is available, about three-quarters or more of all students studied English.

It is important to remember that this data represents a snapshot of language learning in one year – 2017 – rather than a student’s language exposure over the full course of their academic career. For instance, while the Netherlands ranks toward the bottom in terms of all students learning English in 2017, this is driven in part by lower proportions of Dutch primary students enrolled in language classes. While only about four-in-ten primary students are enrolled in a language course, nearly all of those students in a language class are already learning English in the classroom. Foreign language classes are not mandated in the Netherlands for students until age 10, one of the later ages in the EU.

Linguistic diversity within a country sometimes affects which languages students learn in school. This is apparent in Belgium, a country where distinct regions are French-speaking while other areas predominantly speak Flemish or German. In the Flemish-speaking community, nearly all students learn French, which is considered a foreign language in that region, while most students in the French-speaking communities learn Dutch. A similar environment can be found in Luxembourg; Belgium and Luxembourg are the only countries where a majority of students are not learning English in school.

While English predominates across these 29 countries, there are some notable regional and country-level differences in who learns which languages in school. Russian is, for example, most often learned in countries that border the Russian Federation or are former members of the Soviet bloc, such as Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia and Bulgaria. French and German appear most often as non-English foreign languages studied in school, in 29 and 23 countries, respectively.

When it comes to three non-European languages measured by Eurostat, rates of learning in school drop precipitously. In no country do more than 2% of students study languages such as Chinese, Japanese or Arabic in the classroom in a given year, dating back to at least 2012. This holds true when looking at overall proportions as well as only among secondary students, where language learning rates tend to be higher.

Predominantly English-speaking countries – including the U.S. – have lower rates of foreign language learning, though the data is not comparable to the rest of Europe in some cases. In the U.S., only about 20% of K-12 students studied a foreign language in school, according to a 2017 report from the American Councils for International Education. This includes 14% who studied Spanish, 2% who learned French and 1% who were taking German courses.

Most students in Ireland learn English and Gaelic, but neither is considered a foreign language. Likewise, the National University of Ireland found 30% of Irish graduates complete their secondary education without a foreign language in their final qualification. And while the UK does mandate that students study at least one foreign language in school, they have the latest minimum starting age of all countries in Europe (11 years old). Studies from the BBC and the British Academy have shown steady decreases in the number of British secondary students taking exams in foreign languages, with noteworthy drop-offs in French and German language students since 2017.

This content was originally published here.