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mandarin

Learn Chinese in Shanghai (Get Fluent, Fast 🏆in 2020-21)

Contact LTL Beijing and Chengde

Email:
Phone: +86 (0) 10 65129057
Mon-Fri: 9am-6.30pm China Time
Beijing CBD, Jianguo Rd. 88 Xiandai SOHO
Building B, 5th Floor, Room 504
建国路88号现代城SOHO B座 504

Our School Locations LTL Beijing on Google


Learn Chinese Shanghai




Enjoy one of our Chinese Courses in Shanghai and take advantage of this sublime city with a huge International community. Learn Chinese in Shanghai whilst discovering what this metropolis has to offer.




LTL Mandarin School believes that Chinese study should not be limited to the classroom. When you study in China you can fully immerse yourself in Chinese culture, giving a deeper understanding of the Chinese language.





© Copyright 2020 LTL Mandarin School – Beijing Shanghai Taipei


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  • LTL Avatar Irene Magnosi

    Irene Magnosi, Student Advisor

    Welcome to LTL Mandarin School!

This content was originally published here.

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mandarin

Learn Chinese in China (2020-21) 🏆 Become Fluent, Fast

All ages and nationalities welcome! Come and Learn Chinese in China with us today.

Our group programs will allow you to make friends with your classmates and experience first rate Mandarin lessons simultaneously.

Chinese classes in Beijing with LTL are specifically kept small. This is to allow you to form a close bond with your teacher and fellow students and increase the speed in which you learn Chinese.

Our school is a comfortable and friendly environment to study Mandarin and you will be made to feel at home at the best Chinese language school in China.

Chinese Classes in Beijing – Average under three students per class
No more than six students – Average class size less than three
Friends for life – Get to know fellow students
Diverse lessons – Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing

Community – We pride ourselves on being a tight knit family
24/7 – Emergency? We are always here to help whatever the hour
Knowledge – Years of experience mean we can advise daily
Student Advisor – Always here to assist you with any queries

Duration % OFF Standard
(20h group)
Intensive
(20h group + 10h 1-on-1)
1 week 0% 2,362 4,789
2 weeks 2% 4,608 9,345
4 weeks 7% 8,773 17,789
8 weeks 16% 15,895 32,231
12 weeks 24% 21,600 43,800
13 – 52 weeks 24% 1,800/wk 3,650/wk

We also offer a special discount if you book your Chinese course over the Christmas period. Visit our Discounts and Supplements page to find out more.

Our personal assessment is something we do before you come to take you Chinese classes in Beijing.

You will speak to us via Whatsapp, Skype or a phone call. NOTE – Our assessment is not a test.

The assessment will involve a short chat with our Director of Studies and a number of basic questions. We do the rest.

There are plenty of restaurants and shops around if you wish to eat lunch outside of school or go shopping.

The nearest metro stop from the school is Da Wang Lu which is located on Line’s 1 and 14 of the Beijing Metro.

All our teachers hold a University Degree in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language and on top of that they have at least 5 years teaching experience. You have to be the best to work at LTL and it shows in our lessons.

When you come to study Chinese in China you are in the best hands possible.

It’s a great environment to learn Chinese in China, and due to our tight knit nature we make everyone feel at home immediately.

We have 17+ classrooms, a kitchen with free tea, coffee and beer and a safe and relaxed place to study Chinese.

There are lots of interesting places to visit in China as well as great things to do in our school cities. Make sure you discuss an outline of your plans with your student advisor during the booking process to make sure you’ll have enough time on your visa.

Every student has different goals aims but ultimately the group class is all about getting your Mandarin ahead as quickly as possible.

Your speaking, reading and writing will improve daily and you can further enhance that by adding on one of our 1 on 1 programs.

This is a key reason why class sizes are kept small. Every student will get ample opportunities to speak Mandarin in class. We believe strongly in getting every student talking as early as possible.

You are learning Chinese in China, so you have to make the most of the opportunity and talking Chinese as much as you can, is vital.

In four hours, we will teach you new grammar concepts, new vocabulary and new ways of speaking.

Every little bit of Chinese helps and luckily for you we have a host of apps to recommend. Our favourite Chinese learning apps are featured in our blog. We rate and review them. Included are DuolingoSkritter and Chineasy.

Studying Chinese as a Mature Student

Having self-studied Mandarin on and off and being ok at reading but never making much progress with listening and speaking, I had meant to undertake language immersion in China for a long time. In my 30s and a full time accountant in the UK, it had been difficult to find the time to do this. An opportunity arose when I moved jobs last autumn but I had only two weeks available for the trip and so I wanted to make the most of this limited time. Homestay seems the best way to do this and was one of the main reasons I was interested in LTL, which consistently emphasises homestay as an important part of the language learning experience.

It was only the week before the planned trip that it was confirmed I could take the two weeks as annual leave. This meant some fairly frantic last minute visa arrangements (which LTL supported helpfully although it is clearly not an approach they would encourage) and some anxious moments waiting for confirmation that everything was in place. It was only after clearing immigration at Beijing that my heart was finally set at ease and I felt this long-awaited adventure was actually going to happen.

Once in Beijing and being unable to even have much of a conversation with the taxi driver on the way into the city from the airport, I realised my spoken Mandarin was even worse than I had thought. However, my homestay family, in the south of Beijing, were kind and encouraging right from the beginning, making an effort to speak clearly and to draw out coherent sentences from me. The father of the family in particular also took time to talk with me over dinner (excellent food, by the way) about all sort of topics. While a homestay can be a little nerve-wracking if like me you’re not already at a reasonable level of fluency, and you will find yourself looking up a lot of household items in the dictionary, this is the quickest way to improve fluency and I very much recommend this approach over a hotel or lodgings with other students.

The school itself is as other bloggers have described; bright, friendly and in a convenient part of town (and close to some nice restaurants). The group classes, being small, work best with a lot of conversation in Mandarin and limited use of learners’ home languages (typically English and German). It must be said, the school is not cheap but teachers are qualified and experienced and they care about their students’ progress which on balance I think is probably worth paying for. There is a sociable atmosphere and I particularly liked the fact that teachers and students ate lunch together. While some of the students are university students (or straight out of high school), age was not nearly as much of an issue as I had expected, and with students having a variety of backgrounds I was reassured not to be the only ‘oldie’.

Since returning to the UK I have tried to continue studying in my spare time. I recently passed my HSK4 exam and this is largely thanks to those two weeks in Beijing which gave me a much stronger base of listening and speaking from which to continue self-study.

I look forward to one day going to Chengde for the even more immersive program!

This content was originally published here.

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mandarin

Mandarin Monday: The Best News Apps to Help You Learn Chinese

Mandarin Monday is a weekly column where we help you improve your Chinese by detailing learning tips, fun and practical phrases, and trends.

Learning languages from textbooks can help ensure that you are able to build a solid foundation and get to grips with basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. But in order to understand how these rules are applied and transformed in the various contexts of daily life, there is no better pedagogical tool than the ever-evolving world of social media. As Confucius even once said: 三人行,必有我师焉 sān rénxíng, bì yǒu wǒ shī yān, “In a crowd, there’s always someone to learn from.”

However, while social media can provide an eye-opening lesson in colloquialisms and the occasional vulgarity, its chaotic, rapid-fire nature hardly makes it a suitable platform to whittle away the blind spots in your Chinese. Luckily, there is a better way, one that retains some of the freshness of social media without becoming overbearing: newsfeed apps. With their friendly interfaces, a varied selection of topics from trusted sources, they can anyone with an intermediate understanding of Chinese take their study to a whole new level. Click the title to download the app from the App Store.

1. iDaily (difficulty: 2/5)

Best suited to intermediate learners, iDaily provides image-focused briefings of daily global news. Each of the briefings is limited to 200 words, making it less intimidating than other outlets and allowing for comprehension testing. A fun design flourish is that the user interface will pin the news on the map to show the distance between you, the user, and the location of the event, creating a sense of globality even if you’re far away.

2. Houxu – 后续 hòuxù (difficulty: 3/5)

Houxu’s slogan is “News that has memory.” To achieve that sense recollection, they employ a timeline for each story, tracing each major development all the way back to the start of the event. The result is a practical thread that weaves pieces of stories together and creates an ongoing storyboard. For Chinese learners, this has the added benefit of bringing attention to repeating keywords that link different topics, and also help build a better understanding of how stories progress using increasingly specific terminology.

3. Kzfeed – 快知 kuài zhī (difficulty: 4/5)

Compared to the apps above, Kzfeed provides more freedom to its users by allowing them to customize their news feed based on interests or algorithms. Sources are not limited to print or traditional media outlets but also encompass government websites and “self-media.” You’ll also find more video and visual content, which is useful for learners wanting to practice their listening skills.

4. Q Daily – 好奇心日报 hàoqí xīn rìbào (difficulty: 5/5)

As the Chinese name suggests, Q Daily aims to satiate your daily curiosity for news, compiling personal and in-depth perspectives on current affairs unlike anything you’ll find in stale state media. While you’ll find the usual standardized news categories here, where Q Daily truly excels is in its more niche columns which function more like mood boards or personal diaries from their contributors. Also, they add a more interactive element to the news by allowing users to vote and express their attitudes towards various social phenomenons in their “Curiosity Laboratory.”

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

Learn Chinese with Miaomiao

Quality educational shows and apps for kids learning Mandarin Chinese can be hard to find.

Today, I would like to introduce our favorite Mandarin Chinese show and app, Miaomiao. This Chinese learning resource provides a boost for young kids’ learning.

review of Miaomiao Kidz

The post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you. If you make a purchase through a link. See the Disclosure for more details.

There are sorts of Chinese videos on YouTube. Some are good and others are not. If you are in search of extra quality resources for support, then Miaomiao is a great choice.

Miaomiao is a valuable Mandarin resource. It has engaging media, an app & a TV series, plus educational resources.

Miaomiao started around the same time I created Fortune Cookie Mom. I met one of the team members on Twitter and we became good friends.

When they finally finished Miaomiao and were ready to launch, they asked me to write a review for them.

Our Experience with Miaomiao

I focus on teaching my kids Cantonese first and Mandarin second. Miaomiao has been a perfect way to introduce them to Mandarin. Their cute and well-made TV series has helped my kids maintain interest in learning Chinese.

My children (ages 7,5,3) are very interested in watching and even saying the words in Mandarin Chinese out loud. The characters are cute and fun to watch. The series left a great impression on us.

Each episode focuses on one new vocabulary word which makes it easy to learn and remember.

I was so happy to try their newest app Miaomiao’s Chinese for Kids app with my kids. This app gave us an extra boost through videos and tracing Chinese games.

My kids would work extra hard during the day, so they could earn 10 minutes of Miaomiao’s app each day.

The experience was great. My kids have been asking to watch Miaomiao during their screen time for months. They still remember all the vocabulary words learned from each episode.

What is Miaomiao?

iaomiao, by Lofty Ski Entertainment, is an innovative digital media production company from Canada. They created a whole TV series and apps to enhance Chinese language learning. 

Who is Miaomiao for?

It’s perfect for introducing Mandarin Chinese to pre-schoolers and young children (age 2-5). 

Why They Made Miaomiao: Their Mission

The Miaomiao team is a mix of English and Chinese speakers. Each with a connection to the Chinese language and culture. The Miaomiao team understands the impact of screen time. They also understand issues around Chinese language acquisition for young children. And they set out to create a stress-free, fun, and engaging way for kids to learn Mandarin Chinese.

Learn Chinese with Miaomiao

Miaomiao has a TV series and seven apps to turn screen time into learning time for young kids.

Miaomiao TV Series

review of Miaomiao Kidz

Miaomiao has a TV series with a total of 36 episodes.

The TV series follows the adventures of little Miaomiao and her friends. The characters learn as they explore their imaginative world, and solve problems. The power of friendship wins the day at the end of each episode.

In each episode, they teach a new Chinese vocab word and phrase related to the story.

All through the TV series, there is humor to keep kids engaged and it will have your kids laughing. This TV series is perfect for introducing Mandarin Chinese to young kids.

You can watch on Amazon Prime Video or a limited number of episodes on Miaomiao YouTube Channel

review of Miaomiao Kidz

The Miaomiao team has created many apps. These apps go hand in hand with the TV series. After watching an episode, use the Miaomiao’s Chinese for Kids App. They will be able to learn how to write what the Chinese learned from each episode.

Features of Miaomiao’s Chinese for Kids App

  • 50+ episodes of Miaomiao and friends going on adventures and teaching Chinese words.
  • Mandarin preschool teachers and early language learning consultants helped develop the app. This helps ensure learning outcomes
  • Each episode contains an interactive end. Children can trace the Chinese characters learned during the video.
  • Includes a parent console. View your child’s progress and see which words they’ve learned. See a history of episodes they’ve watched.
  • COPPA compliant, ensuring privacy for your child. No ads or in-app purchases.

These are the other Miaomiao apps that you can use while teaching your kids Chinese.

Click this link to learn more about all Miaomiao apps with videos and pictures.

Pricing of Miaomiao

Miaomiao TV Series

HD videos are USD$0.99 for each episode or get it for free with Amazon Prime Video.

Miaomiao Apps

Miaomiao’s Chinese for Kids and other apps are USD$3.99.

Pros and Cons of Miaomiao

review of Miaomiao Kidz

  1. Miaomiao Teaches Chinese Culture
  1. The Pronunciation from Miaomiao is very Native-like Mandarin Chinese
  1. Miaomiao TV Series is Educational and Fun to Watch
  1. Miaomiao’s Apps are Easy and Fun to Use

I wish there were more episodes in the series. I also wish they would include more Chinese cultural stories and festivals. Finally, it would have been nice to have printable activities to go with.

The Miaomiao team did a great job! Creating all these amazing learning Chinese resources for kids is no small task. I know my kids love it and so will yours. Plus it’s very affordable and easy to access.

Other Review from Others

“Miaomiao’s Chinese for Kids is an engaging way for young children to get a taste of Mandarin Chinese. They can learn over 100 words and phrases by seeing, hearing, and writing with characters.”

— 5-star editor review from BestAppsForKids.com.

“Overall, an engaging app with an emphasis on the development of Chinese characters, ideal for young children encountering Chinese for the first time. Worth of its 4-star rating.”

— 4-star teacher review from the Educational App Store.

“We started watching this yesterday and my kids love it!” — Kate Chen, Facebook User

“OH MY!! this show is wonderful!!! 10/10 would recommend to a friend.” — Alex Smith, Youtube User

“I LOVE IT I LOVE COCO AND BEEP BEEP.” —Pamela Taylor, YouTube User

Follow and Contact Miaomiao

There aren’t many Chinese resources out there. Miaomiao is one of the best media resources. With a TV series and many apps to enhance our kids’ Chinese learning experience, its a great option. I am grateful for their fantastic work and creativity. We are so fortunate to have them.

Not sure if your kids are interested in learning Mandarin Chinese? Watch Miaomiao’s video on YouTube to gauge their interest.

Have you tried to watch Miaomiao’s TV series yet?

How’s your experience? Please share it with us in the comments below.

review of Miaomiao Kidz

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Grace

两个小孩的职业妈妈

This is the second 5-Day Challenge that we have done with Fortune Cookie Mom. Both have been very beneficial to our family. I am a homeschool mom of three little kids. We are not Chinese and do not speak any Chinese. With the help of Fortune Cookie Mom, we are slowly learning! The challenges have given me fun activities to do at home with the kids. Each one has reignited my kid’s interest in learning. It has been a fun experience for everybody!


Nicolette

Homeschooling Mom of Three

The post Learn Chinese with Miaomiao appeared first on Fortune Cookie Mom.

This content was originally published here.

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mandarin

Review of Hacking Chinese Language Courses: Learn How to Learn Chinese

Today I want to talk about the new Chinese language courses “Hacking Chinese – A practical Guide to Learn Mandarin” and Unlocking Chinese – The ultimate course for beginners created by Olle Linge, author of the well-known blog, “Hacking Chinese.”

Who is Olle Linge and what is his philosophy on learning?

Olle Linge is a Swedish young man who, after studying for almost a decade, obtained a masters degree for teaching Chinese as a second language in Taipei. Besides teaching Chinese privately and managing “Hacking Chinese”, which is in my opinion one of the two or three best websites around, Olle has also created two courses that promises to teach you how to learn Chinese.

Olle sums up his philosophy on learning through an ancient proverb:

“授人以魚,不如授人以漁.”

“Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”

Based on this philosophy, the courses “Hacking Chinese” and “Unlocking Chinese” are not your typical courses presenting the basics of vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, etc; rather it’s a compilation of strategies and tactics for learning Chinese in an effective manner.

Even though Olle doesn’t openly cite it, I think the course is an example – applied to the learning of Chinese – of the Pareto Principle, which is very simple:

“80% of the results are obtained through 20% of the efforts.”

The important question, therefore, when preparing yourself for learning Chinese (or just about any foreign language), is the following:

“How do I know which 20% of the activities will give me 80% of the results so that I can focus my available time for learning Chinese on these types of activities, learn as quickly as possible, and at the same time not get discouraged and stop studying?”

Look, if you had to summarize the courses in a single phrase, I would say that it answers the question that I just raised.

But obviously, there’s much more! Below I will explain what the two courses contain and how they’re structured.

How much do they cost and what do the “Hacking Chinese” courses offer?

The “Unlocking Chinese” course costs 97 USD and offers the following:

  • A video course (more than 50 videos organized according to 5 subjects)
  • A package of sentences with audio tracks (containing the 150 most used words in Chinese)
  • Tools to improve pronunciation
  • A community forum (to be able to discuss learning Chinese with other users)
  • Discounts on various services and apps useful for learning Chinese.

Important: To ensure the quality of the course, registrations are limited, and open at different times for a period of 10 days. Click here to find out when the next registration period will begin.

The course “Hacking Chinese” costs 97 USD and offers instant access to:

  • A video course (15 videos);
  • An e-Book of 347 pages;
  • The audio edition of the e-Book (read by Olle himself);
  • Discounts on various services and apps useful for learning Chinese.

Note that Olle offers a 30-Day Money Back Guarantee from your date of purchase.

What is the structure of the “Unblocking Chinese” course?

The course for beginners or people with no knowledge of the language is structured in the form of five chapters (each of which contains links to the corresponding videos and a list of select resources to delve deeper into the subject covered):

Keys to learning Chinese

In my opinion, this introductory chapter is the most important one in the course. In it, the author discusses how to start learning Chinese on the right foot, which is essential if you want to be successful.

This section will help you to correctly analyze the reasons why you want to learn Chinese and what your goals should be. Besides, it will help you learn how to make the most of courses, textbooks, and Chinese lessons.

How to learn how to speak Chinese

This chapter is an extensive guide to Chinese phonetics including the following:

  • Guide to dialects
  • Guide to the written transcription of Chinese phonetics (Pinyin, Zhuyin and IPA)
  • Guide to learning to pronounce and recognize tones
  • Tricks for understanding a native speaker
  • The importance of language immersion (at home or abroad)
  • Tricks and tools for being able to practice your pronunciation with native speakers
  • How to learn vocabulary and sentences in Chinese

    In this section, Olle teaches you some of the most useful techniques and tools for actually learning Chinese.

    Learning any language is a huge exercise in memory, and Chinese is particularly difficult in this sense. However, some techniques can make your studying much more effective.

    In this section, you will learn how to apply mnemotechnics to Chinese, what they are, how to use spaced repetition or SRS software, the correct way to build sentences and many other tricks to not sound like a foreigner, even if you translate sentences.

    How to learn Chinese writing

    While for beginners, Chinese writing may seem an impossible task, there is a logic behind Chinese characters.

    This chapter teaches you how to structure and form Chinese characters, the logic behind characters, the correct way to write them and the best techniques for learning to recognize and write them.

    Also, you will find useful techniques to be able to start to read in Chinese, even with limited knowledge of the language.

    How to design your strategy for learning Chinese

    This section is also an essential part of the course. Having a concrete plan is just as important as learning. Here, you will learn, through examples, how to design your learning plan so that it is compatible with your busy daily life and how to evaluate whether you meet the established goals.

    How is the course “Hacking Chinese” structured?

    Aside from the introduction, the course is divided into five chapters (for each you’ll find a link to corresponding videos and a list of resources chosen to deepen the particular theme):

    Strategies for learning

    In this chapter, using the metaphor of an adventure in the jungle, Olle explains how learning another language is a very personal journey that depends on your current level, situation and above all your final objective.

    The chapter also explains how to maintain motivation in the long term, reducing as much as possible the negative feelings caused by learning Chinese that if faced “passively” will become extremely tedious.

    To conclude, Olle lists the pros and cons of various methods for learning Chinese (at home, in school, the “kamikaze” approach, etc).

    Characters, vocabulary and grammar

    This chapter discusses the best methods for learning characters, vocabulary (contrary to what many beginners think Chinese characters do change meaning according to the characters that follow or proceed a given character) and grammar.

    The chapter also explains how to learn and reviews two extremely different concepts such as software SRS that can help you optimize the time spent reviewing (but warning you that SRSs are not a panacea to cover all ills – another common misconception that I too was guilty of), and how wrong it is to try to remember 100% of what you learn.

    The last part of the chapter is dedicated to mnemonic devices, which I too feel are fundamental if you want to avoid learning Chinese words through incredibly boring (and often useless) repetitions, and techniques for learning to write Chinese characters.

    Improving in reading and listening to Chinese

    This chapter covers techniques for bettering your ability to read and understand spoken Chinese. Olle – and I find myself in agreement, – believes that the “secret” is to read and listen to Chinese as much as possible.

    The difficult thing is understanding how to do so since your time is limited. The chapter goes on to list various techniques for “immersing yourself” in reading and listening.

    Want an example of the many suggestions you’ll find in this chapter? If you enjoy playing video games, try changing the language of your PlayStation to Chinese!

    Improving in speaking and writing Chinese

    This chapter is laid out similarly to the previous one, focusing instead on techniques for improving your ability to speak and write Chinese. What struck me the most was the part dedicated to the most common errors in pronunciation (perhaps because it has always been my weak spot).

    Managing and planning your studies

    This chapter is dedicated to techniques for maintaining motivation while learning Chinese, even if it seems you’re not progressing fast enough.

    In my opinion, this is very important, because, for a Westerner, Chinese presents further difficulties as far as learning goes than, for example, learning French. Progress is, therefore, slower; and that requires greater effort in terms of “motivation”.

    Click here to access right away
    the “Hacking Chinese” course!

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

15+ Favourite Chinese Cartoons and Productions For Kids To Learn Chinese At Home

Many parents, including myself, face the struggle in appreciating Chinese as both a language and school subject. The key to mastering Chinese according to many experts, is to practise it, hear it and use it. Some homes may lack the essential cultural context. Instead of leaving it to the exasperated Chinese teachers or enrichment centres, why not introduce little ones to videos and let them watch these “learn Chinese cartoons” and videos to pick up more mandarin while enjoying listening to the “prim and proper” pronunciation.


Screentime….in Chinese! – Learn Chinese Through Cartoons

Our tip: start screen time in Chinese so the kids get used to watching a Chinese medium rather than protest at the unfamiliarity.

Penelope Bear (蓝色小考拉贝贝生活记)

Penelope Bear is a familiar character to some and the English version of the cartoon is shown on BBC channel. One of my go-tos when my kids were really young was Penelope Bear. We loved the whimsical illustrations and conversations between Penelope, her friends, family and teachers. Each episode is only five minutes long and covers much of Penelope’s life on learning to ride a bicycle, performing in a school parade, painting which are activities the little ones can relate to. I loved how Penelope’s parents were always so encouraging and patient with her, which is a great takeaway for parents as well. Check out the episodes here and have fun learning Chinese through these cartoons.

Qiao Hu (巧虎)

We like Taiwanese children’s shows for their fun-loving mascots and interactivity with their audiences. Singing, dancing, answering questions children ask is what the show is about. This is also another go-to for preschoolers and it makes learning Chinese fun and easy. This show is so popular it even has an entire range of merchandise for sale. Check out the videos either on Youtube or here. Just a tip, I personally prefer the older episodes for a “live tv” feel rather than the cartoon versions.

Yoyo TV

Another made-in-Taiwan production, Yoyo TV has different content for different ages. It has Chinese songs accompanied by the cast and graphics, reality TV, toy unboxing, Chinese learning and more. It’s a pretty comprehensive channel and parents (and kids) have plenty to select from. Check out Yoyo TV here.

Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf (喜羊羊与灰太狼)

This is a Chinese animated series about sheep versus a clumsy wolf. You could possibly anticipate what will happen whenever the wolf thinks of attacking the sheep. Children will probably be really tickled with the animals’ antics. See link to official Youtube channel.

Octonauts ( 海底小纵队)

Octonauts would be familiar to many of the kids. We love the focus on learning about marine creatures and was delighted to find the series dubbed in Mandarin. It could be a little challenging to grasp as the names of the animals are all in mandarin, hence parents can sit next to their child to watch it together. Screentime can also be bonding time, right? Official Youtube channel is here.

Berenstein Bears(贝贝熊)

Another popular series found in both print and TV, Berenstein Bears is about a family of bears and their adventures. From bullying, money management, sibling rivalry and decision-making, the topics are relevant and relatable to families. We also like how they teach values to the kids. Examples of episodes can be foundhere.

GG Bond (猪猪侠)

GG Bond - learn Chinese cartoons
Image: GG Bond

A cheeky, intelligent Superhero pig who loves lollipops – clearly is a great formula for a kid’s cartoon. It definitely works as both my boys love this show. The pig aptly named “GG Bond” has superhero powers and a team of superhero friends who battle fierce robots and other baddies. The show celebrates friendship, courage, integrity and also discusses environmental issues. All episodes can be found here.

Little Fox Chinese

Little Fox Chinese - Chinese Shows You Can Watch At Home To Improve Language Skills
Little Fox Chinese

Little Fox Chinese is a Youtube channel screening songs, stories, Chinese lessons for different grades of students – from beginner to advanced levels. We liked the stories on Sun Wu Kong (Monkey King) and folktale series which are all well-produced. You can also show your children videos on learning hanyu pinyin via songs and Chinese through repetitive words in songs. Link to channel here.


Chinese Shows on Netflix

Netflix subscribers can easily change the kids’ shows to be dubbed in mandarin pretty easily by selecting the audio language under the “Audio and subtitles” tab. Our recommended shows include Hilda, Storybots, Super Wings and Magic School Bus.


Local Chinese TV Shows and Productions for Kids

Tao Shu

For parents who prefer a more localised context, you could show your kids Tao Shu which is a locally produced cartoon series. Discover Chinese cultures, customs and traditions in the educational show which also features kids exploring certain Chinese traditions such as Kungfu and learning to use chopsticks. Watch Tao Shu here.


Chinese Edutainment on Mewatch

Chinese Edutainment on Mewatch
Image: Rewatch

With Toggle’s recent rebrand to Mewatch, viewers can still see the local productions via “series”. Shows such as Junction Tree, Mark Your Calendar, I Can Cook Too!, Fresh Farmers are great ways for children to learn the language through stories, significant dates, cooking and even farming. Choose from the selection here.

For older children, you might want to engage them in current affairs, social commentaries, history and cultural documentaries. Browse this link for the selection.


Don’t just Watch but Use the Language too!

While using screentime can be an effective way for quick language acquisition, we strongly advise parental guidance and support when enjoying the videos. Of course, more ideal ways of learning Chinese include writing, reading and using it in daily conversations! Perhaps discussing the show after watching it, answering some questions in mandarin or even penning down some thoughts in Chinese can help parent-child bond using the language. You might even brush up on your own Chinese just like me!

The post 15+ Favourite Chinese Cartoons and Productions For Kids To Learn Chinese At Home appeared first on Little Day Out.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack launched, a perfect starter kit for learning how to read and write Chinese

MSL Master announces the launch of Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack, a perfect starter kit for non-Chinese speaking students to start learning how to read and write Chinese. Students will have access to textbooks, Chinese lessons, and audio recordings, all at once, learning not only individual Chinese characters, but also how to use these characters to read and write nice conversations and interesting stories. It is the latest addition to MSL Master’s products and services offered to learners of Chinese worldwide.

“This is exciting.” Says April Zhang, the owner of the company and also a long time Chinese teacher, “Learning how to read and write Chinese is definitely going beyond learning individual characters.” There are so many books and online lessons teaching only individual Chinese characters which students do not know how to use. Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack is going to change that completely. Indeed, there is so much students can do with as few as 70 characters. “Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack will surely be a confidence booster.” April says.

Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack includes one Chinese Learning Pen, one copy of Chinese Reading and Writing 1 (Enhanced Edition 2020), and one copy of Chinese Reading and Writing 2 (Enhanced Edition 2020).

Chinese Reading and Writing 1 & 2 are content rich and exercise rich textbooks. Starting from strokes and stroke orders, these two books teach 120 Chinese characters, 316 words and expressions, and 10 grammar points. The exercise sections include a total of 312 sentences, 25 conversations and 10 narratives. Moreover, 37 animated video lessons are available for these two books. Students can watch these lessons either on MSL Master’s website or scan the QR codes imbedded on the book pages.

Chinese Learning Pen is the perfect tool for studying Chinese Reading and Writing series. It is a digital tool to play any part of the texts at ease. It adds an interactive dimension, and will greatly enhance students’ learning outcomes. Moreover, teacher’s explanations on particular issues are also available on the touch of a Pen.

“Amid the current COVID pandemic, both teachers and students need more support and more innovative solutions.” April says, “Chinese Learning Pen Value Pack can be of great help to them.”

Pre-order is available on Sep 30, 2020. Don’t miss its introductory offer.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

Learn Chinese Effortlessly: Extensive List of Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) Part 1

Often cracking your head wondering how your little ones at home can learn Chinese effortlessly and score well for their exams?

Sorry, but we’d have to burst your bubble. It won’t be effortless, but it won’t be as hard. 

There’s one thing you can do though: expand your kid’s vocabulary library.

When we talk about learning a language, it always seems like grammar is the most important element.

Grammar is a methodical system that’s somewhat complicated, and you may be wrestling with your own mediocre Chinese skills before you’re capable of teaching your child grammar. 

It may be worrying, but don’t be! Leave that job to the professionals at school. It takes some time before your child will be able to master the gist of Chinese grammar.

But you can focus on helping them build the other pillar of the language—vocabulary—which we’re quite sure you’d be able to do. 

But remember, we don’t expect your child to memorise everything that we’ve listed. 

Smart learners don’t memorise, instead, they link ideas together, which means meaningful learning

Vocabulary, especially idioms, are fundamentally short stories.

And stories are formed when ideas connect to one another.

So, your kid is better off trying to understand these stories than to memorise them.  

Let’s first start with the basics: words (词语). 

Get the hang of Chinese in a breeze: Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) 

Words (词语)

Commonly seen antonyms (反义词) for words (词语)

We are big fans of antonyms!  When antonyms are used effectively in a sentence, it brings life to the entire writing. It also discreetly manifests the writer’s deep understanding of the language since they’re able to create contrast based on the context and words. We list out a few commonly seen ones that students can use in their writings without a sweat. 

*The list is quite extensive, so take some time to go through it.

Words (词语): 

Adjectives (形容词): 

饥寒—温饱、真诚—虚假、冷漠—热忱、安全—危险、复杂—简单、温暖—凉爽、

柔和—严厉、虚心—骄傲、热情—冷淡、诚实—虚伪、傲慢—谦虚、懦弱—勇敢、

丑陋—美丽、愚蠢—聪明、正常—反常、非凡—平凡、特别—一般、扫兴—高兴、

开心—苦闷、寻常—异常、强盛—衰败、激烈—平静、嘈杂—寂静、失信—守信、

伟大—渺小、活泼—呆板、鲜艳—暗淡、严寒—酷暑、安谧—嘈杂、清醒—糊涂、

荒芜—耕种、清晰—浑浊、坚强—软弱、纯熟—生疏、陌生—熟悉、光滑—粗糙、

慎重—随便、痛快—难受、幽静—喧闹、崎岖—平坦、刚强—软弱、慌忙—镇定、

熟识—生疏、伶俐—笨拙 、镇定—慌张、羞涩—大方、严寒—炎热、洒脱—拘谨、

明朗—阴沉、沉重—轻盈、清澈—浑浊、脆弱—坚强、衰弱—强健、犹豫—坚定、

复杂—简单、自在—拘束、平常—奇特、勤劳—懒惰、密集—稀疏、胜利—失败、

宽敞—狭窄、倾斜—竖直、闻名—无名、有趣—乏味、舒畅—苦闷、高兴—难过、

飞快—缓慢、精彩—平淡、笨重—轻便、诚实—虚伪、容易—困难、熟练—生疏、

准确—错误、暴躁—温和、近处—远处、气愤—欢喜、粗心—细心、洁白—乌黑、

高兴—痛苦、宽阔—狭窄、新款—陈旧、兴旺—衰败、团结—分裂、敏捷—迟钝、

高兴—伤心、简单—复杂、常常—偶尔、幼稚—老练、含糊—清楚、严重—轻微、

茂密—稀疏、光明—黑暗、微弱—强大、杰出—平庸、恶劣—良好、灿烂—暗淡、

特殊—普通、简陋—豪华、诚意—假意、有趣—乏味、一向—偶尔、善良—凶恶、

寂静—热闹、穷苦—富裕、健康—虚弱、忧虑—放心、糟糕—精彩、潮湿—干燥、

寂寞—喧闹、奴隶—主人、统一—分裂、繁荣—衰败、精致—粗糙、权利—义务、

聪明—愚笨、空虚—充实、伶俐—笨拙、狭窄—宽阔、晦暗—明亮、勇敢—懦弱、

宽容—严格、好心—恶意、迟延—提前、破碎—完整、酥软—坚硬、炎热—寒冷、

诚实—撒谎、仔细—马虎

Verbs (动词): 

索取—奉献、喜欢—讨厌、增添—减少、怀疑—相信、轻蔑—敬重、违背—遵循、

尊重—侮辱、信奉—背弃、率领—追随、退化—进化、凝结—溶解、聚拢—分散、

拒绝—同意、挺进—撤退、结束—开始、紧张—轻松、整齐—纷乱、撒谎—诚实、

慈祥—凶恶、可爱—可恶、紧张—轻松、仔细—粗心、附近—远方、赞许—反对、

听从—违抗、承认—否认、拒绝—接受、惩罚—奖励、示弱—逞强、表扬—批评

Words of ‘colours’ 

There is an unspoken understanding among most educators that using slightly fancy terms, phrases or even including classic poems makes a piece of composition impressive. If that’s too much to ask for, start with something simple. Plenty of expressions and idioms are derived from colours. Using them as descriptive words can lighten up the whole conversation and put a ‘wow’ effect on writings.

Yellow 黄:金黄、杏黄、橙黄、鹅黄

Red 红:火红、粉红、橘红、桃红、砖红、赤红

Green 绿:嫩绿、翠绿、碧绿、墨绿

Blue 蓝:宝蓝、碧蓝、蔚蓝、湛蓝

Fixed phrases (固定结构) 

We talked about using techniques to improve Chinese composition for primary school kids, such as using great composition startings and endings, using catchy phrases, etc.

These phrases are also called fixed phrases, where they have a relatively fixed structure with an order that generally cannot be changed. Too confusing? Take a look at the following and you’ll get what we mean.

#1 ABB

慢吞吞、懒洋洋、兴冲冲、圆溜溜、胖乎乎、红扑扑、笑呵呵、乐陶陶、喜滋滋、静悄悄、雾沉沉、雨蒙蒙、绿油油、黑乎乎、白花花、白茫茫

#2 AABB

高高兴兴、许许多多、漂漂亮亮、扎扎实实、真真实实、真真正正、子子孙孙、仔仔细细、红红火火、明明白白、干干净净、规规矩矩、恭恭敬敬、陆陆续续、零零星星、轻轻松松、确确实实、切切实实、清清爽爽、舒舒服服、是是非非、四四方方、结结实实、断断续续、大大小小、彻彻底底、层层叠叠、长长短短、重重叠叠、日日夜夜、抄抄写写、粗粗细细、孤孤单单、高高低低、来来往往、里里外外、深深浅浅

#3 AABC

栩栩如生、翩翩起舞、恋恋不舍、历历在目、面面俱到、头头是道、源源不断、彬彬有礼、息息相关、蒸蒸日上、津津有味、滔滔不绝

#4 ABAC

人山人海、如诗如画、诚心诚意、惟妙惟肖、自言自语、自怨自艾、无影无踪、无法无天、无边无际、各式各样、有说有笑

#5 又A又B

又唱又跳、又长又细、又说又笑、又松又软、又香又脆、又圆又大、又滑又嫩

#6 A来A去

游来游去、飞来飞去、说来说去、跑来跑去、抛来抛去、走来走去、跳来跳去

#7 不A不B

不慌不忙、不紧不慢、不知不觉、不闻不问

Idiomatic expressions (成语)

Phrases and their antonyms and synonyms

Synonyms and antonyms are important to writing, whichever language it is for. 

Some benefits of synonyms and antonyms: 

  1. Improve reader’s experience
  2. Make text much more engaging 
  3. Help avoid boring and repetitive text

Click on the images below to view various phrases with their corresponding antonyms and synonyms.

Here’s a video for more!

A good writer will know: Make full use of synonyms (近义词) to make a piece of writing gripping. And don’t neglect antonyms (反义词); they make a strong statement and an outstanding contrast to the overall context.

Posted by Connected Learning on Thursday, February 20, 2020

Conclusion

We’re not quite done yet! We’re going to continue updating the topic so hang on tight to this blog so you can guide your child to grasp what’s important for the language!

Is your child bad in Chinese vocabulary? Forming good sentences? Or need more improvements in their oral language skills? 

Our online live lessons targets to brush up student’s oral, comprehension, listening comprehension, composition and spelling skills. And most importantly, to grow their interest in learning Chinese! 

Click below to discover what our lessons can offer to help your child.

Find out more about our lessons

The post Learn Chinese Effortlessly: Extensive List of Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) Part 1 appeared first on Connected Learning.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

Learn Chinese Effortlessly: Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) Part 1

Often cracking your head wondering how your little ones at home can learn Chinese effortlessly and score well for their exams?

Sorry, but we’d have to burst your bubble. It won’t be effortless, but it won’t be as hard. 

There’s one thing you can do though: expand your kid’s vocabulary library.

When we talk about learning a language, it always seems like grammar is the most important element.

Grammar is a methodical system that’s somewhat complicated, and you may be wrestling with your own mediocre Chinese skills before you’re capable of teaching your child grammar. 

It may be worrying, but don’t be! Leave that job to the professionals at school. It takes some time before your child will be able to master the gist of Chinese grammar.

But you can focus on helping them build the other pillar of the language—vocabulary—which we’re quite sure you’d be able to do. 

But remember, we don’t expect your child to memorise everything that we’ve listed. 

Smart learners don’t memorise, instead, they link ideas together, which means meaningful learning

Vocabulary, especially idioms, are fundamentally short stories.

And stories are formed when ideas connect to one another.

So, your kid is better off trying to understand these stories than to memorise them.  

Let’s first start with the basics: words (词语). 

Get the hang of Chinese in a breeze: Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) 

Words (词语)

Commonly seen antonyms (反义词) for words (词语)

We are big fans of antonyms!  When antonyms are used effectively in a sentence, it brings life to the entire writing. It also discreetly manifests the writer’s deep understanding of the language since they’re able to create contrast based on the context and words. We list out a few commonly seen ones that students can use in their writings without a sweat. 

*The list is quite extensive, so take some time to go through it.

Words (词语): 

Adjectives (形容词): 

饥寒—温饱、真诚—虚假、冷漠—热忱、安全—危险、复杂—简单、温暖—凉爽、

柔和—严厉、虚心—骄傲、热情—冷淡、诚实—虚伪、傲慢—谦虚、懦弱—勇敢、

丑陋—美丽、愚蠢—聪明、正常—反常、非凡—平凡、特别—一般、扫兴—高兴、

开心—苦闷、寻常—异常、强盛—衰败、激烈—平静、嘈杂—寂静、失信—守信、

伟大—渺小、活泼—呆板、鲜艳—暗淡、严寒—酷暑、安谧—嘈杂、清醒—糊涂、

荒芜—耕种、清晰—浑浊、坚强—软弱、纯熟—生疏、陌生—熟悉、光滑—粗糙、

慎重—随便、痛快—难受、幽静—喧闹、崎岖—平坦、刚强—软弱、慌忙—镇定、

熟识—生疏、伶俐—笨拙 、镇定—慌张、羞涩—大方、严寒—炎热、洒脱—拘谨、

明朗—阴沉、沉重—轻盈、清澈—浑浊、脆弱—坚强、衰弱—强健、犹豫—坚定、

复杂—简单、自在—拘束、平常—奇特、勤劳—懒惰、密集—稀疏、胜利—失败、

宽敞—狭窄、倾斜—竖直、闻名—无名、有趣—乏味、舒畅—苦闷、高兴—难过、

飞快—缓慢、精彩—平淡、笨重—轻便、诚实—虚伪、容易—困难、熟练—生疏、

准确—错误、暴躁—温和、近处—远处、气愤—欢喜、粗心—细心、洁白—乌黑、

高兴—痛苦、宽阔—狭窄、新款—陈旧、兴旺—衰败、团结—分裂、敏捷—迟钝、

高兴—伤心、简单—复杂、常常—偶尔、幼稚—老练、含糊—清楚、严重—轻微、

茂密—稀疏、光明—黑暗、微弱—强大、杰出—平庸、恶劣—良好、灿烂—暗淡、

特殊—普通、简陋—豪华、诚意—假意、有趣—乏味、一向—偶尔、善良—凶恶、

寂静—热闹、穷苦—富裕、健康—虚弱、忧虑—放心、糟糕—精彩、潮湿—干燥、

寂寞—喧闹、奴隶—主人、统一—分裂、繁荣—衰败、精致—粗糙、权利—义务、

聪明—愚笨、空虚—充实、伶俐—笨拙、狭窄—宽阔、晦暗—明亮、勇敢—懦弱、

宽容—严格、好心—恶意、迟延—提前、破碎—完整、酥软—坚硬、炎热—寒冷、

诚实—撒谎、仔细—马虎

Verbs (动词): 

索取—奉献、喜欢—讨厌、增添—减少、怀疑—相信、轻蔑—敬重、违背—遵循、

尊重—侮辱、信奉—背弃、率领—追随、退化—进化、凝结—溶解、聚拢—分散、

拒绝—同意、挺进—撤退、结束—开始、紧张—轻松、整齐—纷乱、撒谎—诚实、

慈祥—凶恶、可爱—可恶、紧张—轻松、仔细—粗心、附近—远方、赞许—反对、

听从—违抗、承认—否认、拒绝—接受、惩罚—奖励、示弱—逞强、表扬—批评

Words of ‘colours’ 

There is an unspoken understanding among most educators that using slightly fancy terms, phrases or even including classic poems makes a piece of composition impressive. If that’s too much to ask for, start with something simple. Plenty of expressions and idioms are derived from colours. Using them as descriptive words can lighten up the whole conversation and put a ‘wow’ effect on writings.

Yellow 黄:金黄、杏黄、橙黄、鹅黄

Red 红:火红、粉红、橘红、桃红、砖红、赤红

Green 绿:嫩绿、翠绿、碧绿、墨绿

Blue 蓝:宝蓝、碧蓝、蔚蓝、湛蓝

Fixed phrases (固定结构) 

We talked about using techniques to improve Chinese composition for primary school kids, such as using great composition startings and endings, using catchy phrases, etc.

These phrases are also called fixed phrases, where they have a relatively fixed structure with an order that generally cannot be changed. Too confusing? Take a look at the following and you’ll get what we mean.

#1 ABB

慢吞吞、懒洋洋、兴冲冲、圆溜溜、胖乎乎、红扑扑、笑呵呵、乐陶陶、喜滋滋、静悄悄、雾沉沉、雨蒙蒙、绿油油、黑乎乎、白花花、白茫茫

#2 AABB

高高兴兴、许许多多、漂漂亮亮、扎扎实实、真真实实、真真正正、子子孙孙、仔仔细细、红红火火、明明白白、干干净净、规规矩矩、恭恭敬敬、陆陆续续、零零星星、轻轻松松、确确实实、切切实实、清清爽爽、舒舒服服、是是非非、四四方方、结结实实、断断续续、大大小小、彻彻底底、层层叠叠、长长短短、重重叠叠、日日夜夜、抄抄写写、粗粗细细、孤孤单单、高高低低、来来往往、里里外外、深深浅浅

#3 AABC

栩栩如生、翩翩起舞、恋恋不舍、历历在目、面面俱到、头头是道、源源不断、彬彬有礼、息息相关、蒸蒸日上、津津有味、滔滔不绝

#4 ABAC

人山人海、如诗如画、诚心诚意、惟妙惟肖、自言自语、自怨自艾、无影无踪、无法无天、无边无际、各式各样、有说有笑

#5 又A又B

又唱又跳、又长又细、又说又笑、又松又软、又香又脆、又圆又大、又滑又嫩

#6 A来A去

游来游去、飞来飞去、说来说去、跑来跑去、抛来抛去、走来走去、跳来跳去

#7 不A不B

不慌不忙、不紧不慢、不知不觉、不闻不问

Idiomatic expressions (成语)

Phrases and their antonyms and synonyms

Synonyms and antonyms are important to writing, whichever language it is for. 

Some benefits of synonyms and antonyms: 

  1. Improve reader’s experience
  2. Make text much more engaging 
  3. Help avoid boring and repetitive text

Click on the images below to view various phrases with their corresponding antonyms and synonyms.

Here’s a video for more!

A good writer will know: Make full use of synonyms (近义词) to make a piece of writing gripping. And don’t neglect antonyms (反义词); they make a strong statement and an outstanding contrast to the overall context.

Posted by Connected Learning on Thursday, February 20, 2020

Conclusion

We’re not quite done yet! We’re going to continue updating the topic so hang on tight to this blog so you can guide your child to grasp what’s important for the language!

Is your child bad in Chinese vocabulary? Forming good sentences? Or need more improvements in their oral language skills? 

Our online live lessons targets to brush up student’s oral, comprehension, listening comprehension, composition and spelling skills. And most importantly, to grow their interest in learning Chinese! 

Click below to discover what our lessons can offer to help your child.

The post Learn Chinese Effortlessly: Chinese Words and Idiomatic Expressions (词语与成语) Part 1 appeared first on Connected Learning.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
mandarin

8 Reasons to Learn Chinese Online with That’s Mandarin

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