Categories
french

Learning French in Paris: The Best Schools and Programs for Your Language Goal

If you’re really trying to speak French, eventually you’ll want to go to the motherland. Unless you are one of those super annoying people who has an “amazing ear” and picks up languages from just a vacation (looking at my sister), you’re going to need a school.

How much it will cost you and how intense of a program you’ll want depends on why you’re in France.

Maybe you’re like my friend Kristi who saved up to spend a summer in Paris. She wanted to learn basics but spend more time seeing the city, not all day sitting in class. Or maybe you’re in France on some sort of Eat, Pray, Love mission finding yourself in croissants, vineyards and Pierres. You may be more interested in social language swaps (where some men come just to meet foreign women) than one-on-one classes. Or maybe you’re like me and wanted to learn as fast as possible without your head exploding so you can talk to your belle-maman (mother-in-law in French is “beautiful mom.” Much nicer, no?).

There are way too many options to give you all of them, but here are the best language schools and programs I’ve personally tried or have otherwise looked into.

IF YOU WANT SMALLER CLASSES

When I first moved to Paris in June 2017, I wanted a smaller school with more personalized feeling to kick start my French learning. I already had the basics, and was looking for a program that would focus a lot of class time on speaking. I found three options that looked great. They don’t have libraries and movie screenings, but do provide a boutique, personal style of learning.

A smaller school is also a good option if you’re only going to be in France for a couple weeks and want to brush up your French quickly. None of these schools utilize textbooks, focusing more on conversational skills and using worksheets when needed.

Lutece Langue ()

I ended up going with Lutece Langue because it had great reviews, was close to my apartment (the school has since moved to the Saint Germain area) and is at a good price point. I’m very glad I did. My classes were never more that 4 or 5 people, my teacher Christine was excellent, patient and fun, and at least half the class was spent practicing conversation. Every day felt like a safe, welcoming place to make mistakes and improve my French speaking, which is exactly what I needed.

Classes are capped at two to seven people. I took the intensive 15 hour a week program in the morning, which cost 246.50€ a week (a little less if you sign up for four or more weeks). They offer also ofter specialized workshops. I liked that the age range of students in my class was from 24-55 years old, and wasn’t all college students. They also have a teacher who speaks Japanese if interesting for you as a student from Japan. Check out the website for all the class options.

French As You Like It ()

FAYLI is another boutique school with “micro group” classes capped at six people. This school actually caters mostly to children studying French, but also has programs for adults during the morning and evening. The school  includes perks like wine tastings and perfume tours, as well as complimentary pastries and treats every day. During my studies there, I’ve had just one other person in my class, so I received a ton or personalized attention.

Located in le Marais near Bastille, the prices are higher than the other two boutique schools I contacted at 445€ a week for a full morning 3.5 hour a day course (17.5 hours/week). Check out the website for full list of class options.

L’Atelier9 ()

I stumbled upon this school online while looking through message board reviews about French programs in Paris, and was impressed by how much students loved the experience. Classes have nine people tops (hence the name) and offers a multimedia experience using songs, newspapers, videos and games in addition to the conversational program.

The “Intensive Plus” program is from 9am-1pm each day plus one workshop a week, and costs 295€ a week with rate discounts for each consecutive week you sign up for. L’Atelier9 also offers Spanish language courses if you’re interested in doubling up on your lessons.

Photo courtesy of Alliance Française Paris

IF YOU WANT A LOT OF RESOURCES

Alliance Française (www.alliancefr.org)

When I lived in France for three months in 2013, I could hardly say bonsoir and needed to start pretty much at the beginning. I had taken a short course at the Alliance Française in New York, and decided to continue at the Alliance Française de Paris.

I was surprised that the textbooks were different from the New York outpost (it’s apparently not standardized across the world), but impressed with the entire operation. Located in the Montparnasse area, the building is very large and modern, with a cinema, language lab, large library and access to loads of free tours and activities for students. It’s a great place if you plan to do a lot of studying and want resources, or are new to Paris and want to meet people from all over the world.

My classes could be large at times, 15 or more people, but the teacher and program were solid. Depending on your budget, you can do everything from a few hours a week to full days of private study at Alliance Française.

IF YOU WANT TO TALK A LOT

A great way to practice your speaking skills is to go to a language exchange group event where English and French native speakers get together and practice together in both languages.

The level and depth of conversation definitely depends on who you are seated with and their personalities. Sometimes people are very shy and it is hard to get the conversation going, other times it clicks easily. I recommend coming with a few fun topics in mind to discuss so you don’t end up having the same discussion about where you are from and what you are doing in France over and over again.

Franglish ()

At Franglish, you basically speed date, but for French-English conversation. If you are a native English speaker looking to improve your French, you show up and are seated at a table across from a francophone. You speak in each language for seven minutes together before moving to another table with a new French speaker and repeating the process for two hours. Because this isn’t a lesson, it’s best to have at least a little experience speaking, so this isn’t a great option for complete beginners.

In Paris, Franglish events are held at various bars around the city. It costs 12€ per session (8€ if you have a student ID) and you get a drink included with that. When I went, there were around 15 English speakers and 15 French speakers. Because it’s at a bar, it has a casual, younger adult feel and there were always new people. I once was seated across from a French guy whose English was perfect, and when I asked why he needed to be here, he admitted he only came to these events to meet women!

Franglish holds events in cities across France and all over the world, so you don’t have to be in Paris to partake. The events are often full, so sign up ahead of time on the website.

Photo courtesy of Institut Catholique de Paris

IF YOU’RE ON A BUDGET

Mairie de ParisCours Municipaux d’Adultes

If you’re a Paris resident (not on a tourist or student visa), you can take classes provided by the city. It’s a little tough to register because the website and emails are all in French, but the prices are very low. The three week summer intensive session I registered for cost just 202€ for three weeks, 4.5 hours a day.

I was initially wait-listed, but was lucky enough to secure a spot for a summer session. The class was not small, 22 people, but that is not that different from many other larger language schools in the city. The students were an interesting mix of people ranging in age from early 20s to senior citizens, and coming from all corners of the globe. Some are retired, some are here for work, some (like me) came for love and some are refugees.

My teacher Claudine was excellent, and I really like how many of the lessons are Paris-centric. You learn a lot about the history of Paris through it’s famous residents, cherished locations and literature. The course is grammar heavy, and I don’t feel like I got as much speaking time in as with the smaller programs, but for the price the quality is very good.

There are also semester-long courses in the spring and fall.

Catholic University of ParisFrench Language Courses

The Catholic University of Paris offers spring and fall semester-long courses and short term classes in January and the summer at reasonable prices. A four week, 15 hour a week summer programs costs 660€, four weeks of 21 hours a week is 924€. There is also a 98€ per year registration fee.

This is a good bit more affordable than comparable programs, and the coursework is rigorous. I took a summer month-long intensive and would say it was worth the money. The campus is lovely, though my classroom was a little small for the 15 or so students in my class.


Photo courtesy of Institut de Francais

IF MONEY IS NO OBJECT

This final school isn’t in Paris, but I’ve had a slight obsession with it ever since I discovered it, so I wanted to share anyway!

Institut de Francais ()

The Basics: 4 weeks, 8.5 hours a day, located in Villefranche on the French Riviera

In my dream scenario, I go off to this adults-only French-language boarding school in the south of France and return to Paris fluent, with a tan and Blake Lively as my new best friend (yup, she went there). The Institut de Francais caters to students 21-75 years old, has an excellent reputation and focuses on speaking and understanding. Absolute beginners to advanced students welcome.

The 4-week course fee varies by time of year and includes 160 hours of coursework, breakfast, lunch and tea on class days, evening outings with teachers and an excursion. This intensive experience doesn’t come cheap, but I justify it to myself by saying I’d be saving money by learning so much so quickly. And if it’s good enough for Blake, the Princess of Monaco and numerous ambassadors, it’s good enough for me.

For a month long program, the tuition is around 3200€ to 3900€ depending on the time of year you go (warmer months are more expensive). The school offers many housing options, or you can find something yourself in town as well.

Find full course schedule and fees here

FINAL TIPS FOR PICKING A PROGRAM

  • If possible, choose a school somewhat close to where you live. You’re going to be there a lot, and not having a long commute makes the experience much easier.
     
  • Group classes are great for learning the basics, but only move as fast as the slowest student, and you’ll be practicing with other students who are non-native French speakers. Because of this, I recommend a balanced diet of classes and forcing yourself to speak with actual French people either in private classes, with friends or through language exchanges.
     
  • Be sure to do your research wherever you choose to go. I looked at some other larger schools and some schools with quite low prices, but found out that they don’t pay their teachers well, had poor reviews or didn’t have a great program. Not worth spending your money on a school where you don’t learn much!

Finally, it’s normal to get frustrated, and even have some language-induced breakdowns at times (speaking from experience). If you want to read more about my experience learning french and living in Paris hardly speaking French, click here.

Have you studied in French in Paris? What school did you choose and what was your experience like? Leave a comment and let me know!

The post Learning French in Paris: The Best Schools and Programs for Your Language Goal appeared first on Am I French Yet?.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
english

Number One News – Learn English By Yourself with the News – NO. 1 INSTITUTE

Step 1 (0-5 minutes)

Start with a video! Most News services offer short 1 or 2 minute news highlights.

I like the News in 90 Seconds with the ABC as they have the key headlines for Australia which update every hour. It’s not for English learners so it will be fast. There are usually 4-6 stories per video.

Watch the video twice with no sound and answer these two questions:

Step 2 (5-15 minutes)

Now watch the video with sound! You can watch it a few times so that you understand the main points. 
Write one sentence to summarise each of the main stories. Use your own words!

Step 3 (15-25 minutes)

Choose ONE of the stories from the video that interests you. Try to find a news article about these stories. You can use any of the websites I listed above. Try to choose an article that is not too long or too difficult for you.
Read the article out loud to yourself. Use a highlighter to highlight any words that are new for you. Don’t stop reading, just highlight and continue.

Step 4 (25-45 minutes)

Check the meaning of the words in a dictionary. Be sure to consider the context so that you choose the right meaning.

Step 5 (45-60 minutes)

Read the article again – write a few key words to summarise each paragraph.

Step 6 (60-90 minutes)

Do some English exercises. 
If you have used an article from an English learning news website then choose some exercises or activities they have. If not, you can make your own! Here are some ideas:
1. Gap fill: Copy the text to Microsoft Word and delete all the highlighted words and replace with a gap. Then go back and see if you can remember which words go in which gap.
2. Cut the story: Cut the story into each line. Mix up all the lines and try to put them back together!
3. Write comprehension questions: Imagine you are the IELTS examiner! What questions would you ask to test whether the student understood the text.

Step 7 (90-120 minutes)

Discuss your opinion.
Think about your own opinion on the article or the topic/ issue. If you can, discuss your opinion with a friend.
Also, many news articles have a comments section at the bottom. If your article does, write your opinion there. You can also read the other comments and reply to people as if you were having a discussion.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
french

The Best French Apps for Learning French

If you are anything like us here at Brainscape, you probably spend hours on your phone every day, emailing, texting, and most importantly, using apps.

While there is something endlessly addicting about trying to reach 2048 over and over, and it can be awfully satisfying to swipe left on Tinder, we have to admit our time could be better spent on other things. Thankfully, there are some great educational apps out there for a more productive phone session.

Not long ago, we posted some of the best education apps for language learning in our post on the Top 5 Language-Learning Apps and Websites. While those five apps are great to get on your phone if you already have the basics down, they are not necessarily ideal when you are just starting out. For you, newbie Francophiles out there, don’t despair. These 7 French apps are some of the best apps to learn French and will get you started acquiring and mastering the language in no time. Très Bien!

Top 7 Beginner Apps for Learning French

1. Duolingo

If you want learning to be fun in a game-like setting, Duolingo  is a great place to start. You can learn vocabulary, conjugation, reading, writing, pronunciation, and listening skills on the app in a way that is competitive and fun. Duolingo has been ranked as the highest-rated French learning app on the Apple App Store for good reason. It’s free, fun, easy to use, and gets you the basics fast. Just be aware that while it may be fun to make learning a competition (with prize badges and everything!), the app isn’t too strict on grammar. You can easily develop bad habits if you aren’t careful, so make sure to supplement any Duolingo learning with a quality vocab and grammar app.

2. Learn French with Busuu

Busuu is based around a community of native French speakers, which makes it easy to ensure that you are learning French the way native speakers really use it today.  You will get a lot of oral practice with and even some feedback on written work from native speakers. Plus, the app makes sure that you learn idioms and modern slang (so you won’t arrive in Paris and sound like you are straight out of a 1950s TV show). Unfortunately, all this interaction with native speakers doesn’t come cheap, as it requires a membership cost of about $20 per month. Plus, the quality of feedback isn’t always even — sometimes you get great information, but other times, you get hardly a cursory response.

3. Classics2Go Collection (French)

Reading in a language you are trying to learn is a must. That’s why this free app is so great. The French Classics2Go Collection has a large selection of fairy tales and other simple, classic children’s stories that you can read at an early stage in your French learning. Not only are these stories familiar, making the vocab and grammar concepts at play easy to digest, but Classics2Go even cross-links with its English app so you can read the versions side by side for a refresher. Plus, once you are getting more fluent, you can easily explore the library for some more complex books like Les Trois Mousquetaires or Madame Bovary.

4. Larousse English-French Dictionary

Every new French learner needs access to a good dictionary, and the Larousse English-French dictionary is the crème de la crème. While it may be tempting to use Google Translate to look up every word you are unsure of, a good dictionary like this one gives you context and connotation as well — critical details for learners. It even has tons of idioms and phrases to keep you in the know. Plus, you can get the words read out loud to you in the app for pronunciation practice.

5. Brainscape French

A dictionary is a great way to learn a specific word that you lack, but unfortunately, it can’t really be used as a way to retain new vocab. That’s where Brainscape’s adaptive flashcard app comes in. Using its custom adaptive learning technology, Brainscape will drill you on thousands of French vocab words such that you spend more time on words you don’t get and less on those you have already mastered. According to extensive scientific research, the key to retention is effective repetition, and Brainscape is the only app on the market that uses the custom algorithm shown to be the best-designed to foster this type of learning.

Not only does Brainscape French have verb conjugations and thousands of vocab cards with audio, it also has a Sentence Builder component that will build up your mastery of grammar concepts through the constant translation of increasingly advanced sentences. Brainscape has also recently added flashcard decks for listening comprehension, as well as others tackling French history and pop culture. If you want to build a robust vocabulary, Brainscape’s methodology is the proven best way to get started.

6. Le Conjugueur

French verb conjugations are tricky. That’s why this app is so fantastic. Le Conjugueur allows you to practice translating verbs and identifying the appropriate tenses to use in different scenarios. Use it to supplement your verb practice and ensure you become a well-rounded conjugator!

7. Rosetta Stone

It’s almost impossible to talk about language learning without mentioning Rosetta Stone. Not only has Rosetta Stone’s app been around the longest, but it also offers a balanced approach. You get to practice speaking, writing, and reading at each skill level. Rosetta Stone offers a completely immersive language learning experience, which means that no English will be found anywhere in this app. This has its advantages (such as learning like you would as a child), but it can be frustrating or even ineffective for some new learners, so consider what kind of learner you are before committing. After all, this program has the largest cost — a whopping $199.99 for all the features.

Get Learning!

Once you get some of these programs on your phone, tablet, or computer, you will be well on your way to speaking French couramment in no time. Don’t delay. While at Brainscape we are partial to our own app (because we know how much it can help you!), getting a few of these apps and using them often is going to support your learning even more. Get the best French apps for learning French on your device now and let us know in the comments what other French learning apps are your favorites.

Brainscape is a web & mobile education platform that
helps you learn anything faster, using cognitive science. Join the
millions of students, teachers, language learners, test-takers, and
corporate trainees who are doubling their learning results. Visit
brainscape.com or find us on the App Store
.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
french

Provencal activities to enjoy whilst learning French!

Provencal activities to enjoy whilst learning French!

By on Aug 19, 2018 in Cruises & Boat Travel, Europe, Food and Drink, France, Regions, Speciality Travel, Travel Miscellany, Western Europe

Being able to speak another language is an enviable skill and one that many of us aspire to acquire at some point, particularly after a holiday abroad! A subscription to Babbel that never gets used and the well-meaning resolution to learn 50 words a day are often the first casualties for the many of us who have a go at learning a language.

The problem faced by aspiring bi-linguists seems to be context and lack of immersion in a language – it’s hard to feel inspired when you’re sat at home gamely working through language exercises on an app. What’s needed is some real-world input and what better way to gain this than by enjoying a range of activities whilst on holiday that help introduce you to the local language. To that end I’ve got five fun activity ideas that will help you pick up some useful French that can be put to good use during your Provence vacation. Bon chance!

A cooking class

Good food is a cornerstone of French society with most social activities centred around food of some description. Even trips to the market (a social activity in its own right) are carried out with the ultimate goal of purchasing wonderful local ingredients that will find their way into a delicious dish or two. The French certainly know their way around a kitchen and a cookery course not only offers the ideal opportunity to acquire the skills needed to take a taste of France home with you, but also a chance to learn some culinary French words and phrases!

My favourite Provencal cookery course is held at Hostellerie Bérard, a 4-star hotel and spa set in the heart of Provence. Home to renowned chef, Jean-François Bérard, the courses themselves are held in the ‘Bastide des Saveurs’, set overlooking the beautiful kitchen garden. Courses last for one day and are normally themed. The day starts with a tour of the kitchen gardens during which you will select fresh produce to harvest that will be used in the dishes before heading back to the kitchen to prepare the meal. And the best bit? Enjoying tasting your creations together at the end of the class, paired with regional wines! Whilst English can be spoken, you’ll be free to partake in French conversation or just pick up a phrase or two as you wish throughout the day.

Wine tasting and vineyard tour

Lunch or dinner in France wouldn’t be the same without a glass of wine (or two). France is as well-known for the variety and quality of its wine as it is for good food, so a wine tasting and vineyard tour are an absolute must for any gastronomically inclined holiday maker. And as a bonus, it offers another ideal opportunity to pick up some French language hints, tips and phrases on the way. And with the edge ever so slightly taken off your inhibitions after a glass, having a go at holding a conversation in French suddenly seems a whole lot less intimidating!

Moulin de la Roque near Bandol offers a 1-day wine tasting course conducted by Jean-Luc Poinsot who has 10 years’ experience in this fascinating field. You will learn all about the history of this vineyard, what the different stages of wine tasting involve, take a trip around the vineyard itself and of course, taste a selection of wines (up to 8). English is spoken but there will be plenty of opportunities to experiment with your French lingo and you will also learn lots of wine related phrases which tend not to appear in the more mundane language learning books!

You can also enjoy a wine tasting at the superb Maisons des Vins de Bandol. Hosted by Tim, these tastings will guide you through a range of wonderful regional wines. Afterwards enjoy exploring the extensive selection of wines using your new found knowledge to decide what to purchase! Find out more here.

Street tour around Marseille

Marseille is the second largest city in France and the largest on the Mediterranean coast. Not only is it sizeable, it’s also really rather spectacular and should definitely feature on your tour of Provence either as a stopover for a couple of days or even just a day trip. With so much to see and do it can be hard to make the most of your visit on your own. A guided tour offers the perfect way to see the best bits and whilst doing so a chance to brush up on your French!

A quick Google of tours will reveal lots of options but I have selected a tour of The Old Town of Marseille run by the Marseille Tourism Office. They take their tours seriously, so you can be assured the guides are knowledgeable and the tour informative and fun. Their Saturday tour is bilingual (English and French) allowing you to enjoy picking up a bit of French whilst still being able to understand some of the more complex sentences! The tour will take you through the streets of the oldest district of Marseille to discover its monuments, history and landmarks that make up this 2600-year-old area of Marseille.

Guided boat tour

The Provencal coastline is stunningly beautiful. And the best way to see and explore the coastline is without doubt from the sea itself. Unless you are a supremely good swimmer, that means heading out on the water in a boat! There are plenty of options available to you from small motor boats to large yachts, along with the choice of hiring a boat which is skippered or braving the open waters yourself.

For many, the most relaxing way to enjoy the view from the sea is by taking a half or full day’s skippered boat trip. Choose where you want to go and what you want to see or let yourself be guided by your skipper. Head to a secluded beach or a restaurant only accessible from the sea. The choice is yours! And on the way your skipper will be happy to converse in French ensuring you not only come back to shore with salt in your hair but with some nautical French phrases to add to your growing French language repertoire! Pirat are a boating company who operate out of pretty seaside town of Bandol (which is well worth a visit regardless). They offer inclusive half day trips with a professional skipper for up to 12 people on modern motor boats.

Drawing and painting classes

One of the many reasons people visit Provence is to enjoy the sheer beauty of the region. Gorgeous countryside merges into beautiful towns and villages. The quality of the light lends an additional charm to scenes which provide a mecca for artists looking for a beautiful scene to paint or sketch. Whether you regularly exhibit or just like dabbling with a few paints, a painting or sketching course offers a fantastic opportunity to enjoy Provence and at the same time practice your French!

Why not try a class offered by Catherine Moulle who is based in the prettiest of towns, Aix-en-Provence. Catherine offers a range of Drawing, sketching, painting, travel journal classes throughout the year. A favourite is a sketchbook drawing workshop which tells the story of what is seen on a stroll around Aix-en-Provence, armed with a sketchbook. This is a wonderful day out with the added bonus of leaving with some memorable sketches and improved French!

Su Stephens is Owner of Olives & Vines. Olives & Vines is a luxury holiday company based in the South of France offering stays at their beautifully designed holiday house and boutique hotel in Le Castellet.

If you would like to be a guest blogger on A Luxury Travel Blog in order to raise your profile, please contact us.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
spanish

Extraordinary Spanish Immersion & Homestay Programs | Study Spanish in Costa Rica – Instituto Estelar Bilingüe

At Estelar, we work hard to live up to our name, which means extraordinary, pertaining to the stars. We are constantly improving our offerings and ensuring that

This content was originally published here.

Categories
french

14 Thoughts Everyone Has While Learning French

All languages have quirks that make them difficult for non-native speakers to learn, and French has no shortage of rules (or lack thereof) that create confusion. Here are 14 grievances every French learner has while learning the language.

1. Is it “le” or “la”?

Why are forks and spoons girls but knives boys? Does it even matter?

2. Numbers above 69 all involve math

Soixante-dix is sixty plus ten, quartre-vingt is four twenties, quatre-vingt-dix is four twenties plus ten… Is this French class or math class?

3. Why are there so many silent letters? 

If most consonants at the end of words, plus the letter E, are silent, think of how much paper could be saved by simply eliminating these excessive letters.

4. Too many double consonants

Again with the unnecessary letters: why double the consonants when just one would seemingly make the same sound?

5. Speaking of silent letters, agreeing adjectives is a waste of ink

You’d think that the people at the Académie Française have better things to do than nitpick over Es and Ss that don’t serve any real purpose if the word is pronounced the same anyway.

6. What’s the deal with movable adjectives?

The confusion between mon ancienne maison and ma maison ancienne could be eliminated if there were just two distinct words. 

7. Rs are the worst

Try saying “serrurerie” five times fast without sounding like you’re choking.

8. The difference between H muet and H aspiré is impossible

Why is it “le hérisson” instead of “l’hérisson,” but “l’hôtel” instead of “le hôtel”? For all their love of grammar rules, it’s surprising that the French don’t have one to help make the distinction.

9. Do I address this person as “vous” or “tu”?

Very important question: what are you supposed to call your significant other’s parents when you meet for the first time? A little guidance in avoiding a faux pas would be greatly appreciated.

10. Direct translations often don’t exist

So obéir means “to obey,” but obéir à quelqu’un means “to obey to someone.” Who thought it would make grammatical sense to obey to someone or permit to someone to do something?

11. Prepositions that accompany verbs are nonsensical

In French, you can’t just choose, prepare, or even want to do something, with the same word for all; you “choisis de,” “prépares à,” or “veux faire quelque chose.” Another set of rules that have no rhyme or reason and do nothing but give people unnecessary headaches.

12. Words with opposite meanings make life unnecessarily confusing

Take the word “terrible”: when your friend talks about the amazing concert she went to last night and says that “il était terrible,” it’s not the same as when, a month later, she comes to you with bad news and says that she has “une terrible nouvelle.” 

13. Plus or plus?

At dinner, when you say “J’en veux plus,” you’d be expected to either stop or continue eating depending on whether you pronounce the final S. Why not just have distinct words that have distinct meanings?

14. There are way too many words that sound the same.

Your sons (fils) would probably not appreciate being called your wires (fils).

Featured image:Stock Photos from Fizkes / Shutterstock

This content was originally published here.

Categories
english

Free Online English Courses on edX – Learn English Online

Are you looking to learn English in the comfort of your own home? Many top universities are now offering a wide range of Free Online English Courses and classes.

Take free online English language courses to improve your English grammar, composition, conversation, and writing skills. Learn effective English communication skills with online classes and courses from Tsinghua, ASU, HKPolyU, and other top schools.

An amazing opportunity for you to improve your English skills with online lessons from top universities and institutions around the world. Whether you’re learning English as a second language (ESL) or just looking to improve your English vocabulary, find to help you advance your skills and your career.

Learn English with Free Online English Courses:

Online Learning Platform:

  • edX

No. of English Courses:

List of Universities offering English Courses:

  1. Georgetown University
  2. The University of Queensland, Australia
  3. Technische Universität München (TUM, Germany
  4. The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  5. The Universitat Politècnica de Valencia (UPV), Spain
  6. Tsinghua University, China
  7. United Arab Emirates University (UAEU)
  8. The University of California, Berkeley, United States
  9. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University 
  10. The University of Washington, United States

Check  – Financial Aid Available 

List of the English Online Courses:

  1. English Grammar and Style
  2. Academic Writing Made Easy
  3. English for Doing Business in Asia – Writing
  4. English for Doing Business in Asia – Speaking
  5. Upper-Intermediate English: Technology Today
  6. Conversational English Skills
  7. Just Reading and Writing in English
  8. EmSAT English Preparation – Level 1
  9. EmSAT English Preparation – Level 2
  10. Upper-Intermediate English: Modern Life
  11. Upper-Intermediate English: Business
  12. Upper-Intermediate English: Globalization
  13. English for Journalists, Part 1
  14. English for Journalists, Part 2
  15. English@Work: Advanced Job Interview Skills
  16. English@Work: Basic Job Interview Skills
  17. Preparing to Network in English
  18. Using Email for Networking in English
  19. The Divine Comedy: Dante’s Journey to Freedom

Benefits of the English Free Courses:

  • Self Paced
  • NO enrollment/registration fee
  • Learn from top instructors
  • Online Course, Learn from home
  • Flexible schedule and environment

Check  – Apply Now

Benefits of an Official Verified Certificate:

The online course is totally free. You can enroll for me, but if you want to get a verified certificate then you need to pay an enrollment fee. The benefits are:

Official and Verified

  • Receive an instructor-signed certificate with the institution’s logo to verify your achievement and increase your job prospects

Easily Shareable

  • Add the certificate to your CV or resume, or post it directly on LinkedIn

Proven Motivator

  • Give yourself an additional incentive to complete the course

EdX offers up to a 90% discount on our verified certificates to learners who can benefit from, but cannot afford to pay, full price. Assistance is available in most courses that offer verified certificates, however, some courses and programs are not eligible. You can be approved up to five times in a twelve-month period for financial assistance. For more information and financial assistance application, visit the financial assistance program

How to enroll in English Online Courses in 2020?

EdX courses are open to everyone. All you need is access to a computer with a current browser, an Internet connection, and, of course, a desire to learn.

To begin the free course, please register for an edX account. You will need to: 

  • Enter your email address
  • Enter your full name
    Your full name will appear on any certificates that you earn.
  • Create a public username for the forums (cannot have spaces) NoteYou cannot change your username once it has been created.
  • Create a password
  • Select your country
  • Select Create your account

When you find an online course that interests you in the course catalog, you can enroll in the course by selecting the Enroll Now button on the course About page. 

How to apply for Online Courses on edX? Complete Video Guide

Registering for an edX account is completely free! You can also take courses for free, or you can choose to pay a fee and pursue a verified certificate.

Note: For more Amazing & Fully-Funded national and international opportunities, visit our website  and Follow us on Facebook PageTwitterInstagramLinkedin, Youtube Channel, and  Telegram.

The post Free Online English Courses on edX – Learn English Online appeared first on Scholarships Corner – Scholarships – Exchange Programs, Leadership Programs, Fellowships, Internships – Conferences – Summer Programs.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
french

Our Favorite Netflix Movies For Learning French

As a Francophile, I’ve always loved French film and TV. During my undergraduate honors year at university in Melbourne, I even wrote a thesis on the subject. But cultural affinity aside, watching French movies and TV series can be a great way to improve your language skills.

An aerial view of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, often seen in Netflix movies, which are great for learning French.
Rodrigo Kugnharski

As someone who is learning the language, I try to listen very carefully while reading the subtitles to associate the words I’m hearing with the translation on the screen. This might sound like work, but when there are entertaining storylines and beautiful scenery, learning the language is made so much easier.

An evening street scene in Paris with bluish tinges and warm reddish lights from the surrounding cafés at this crossroads.
Adrien Olichon

So whether you’re a Francophile, trying to learn French, or both, here are my favorite French films you can watch on Netflix right now.

I’m Not an Easy Man / Je ne suis pas un homme facile

I’m Not an Easy Man is a romantic comedy about a chauvinistic bachelor who suddenly finds himself propelled into a parallel universe where stereotypical gender roles are reversed.

A poster for the French Netflix movie Les Gouts et les Couleurs, a great tool for learning French (left). A man with the word 'hot' written on the back of his trousers, walking through Paris (right).

In this matriarchal society, he struggles as he experiences sexism for the first time and falls in love with a strong, dominant woman. While the film does perpetuate certain gender stereotypes, it is fantastic in the way that it exposes the sexism women face daily and makes you wonder what life would be like if the roles were reversed—while also remaining light-hearted and comical. 

'L'Amour court les rues' (love flows through the streets) inscribed on a zebra crossing, which is a slogan that can now be found all over the city.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly / Le scaphandre et le papillon

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is a biographical drama based on a memoir of the same name written by Jean-Dominique Bauby. Bauby was the editor-in-chief of cult French fashion magazine Elle until he had a devastating stroke at the age of 43.

A poster for the French Netflix movie 'Declaration of War' with a man and woman on a fairground ride (left). The poster for the movie 'The Diving Bell and the Butterfly', with a blonde woman in the top half of the poster and man wiling, driving on the bottom (right).
Declaration of War / The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

This is an excellent, poignant film that earned Julian Schnabel the award for Best Director at Cannes and the Golden Globes, and Mathieu Amalric, who plays Bauby, a César for Best Actor. The film was also named Best Foreign Language Film at the Golden Globes.

A Paris street corner of stone buildings lit up by the last of the day's sun rays (left). A view of Parisian stone buildings in the winter (right).
Zach Dyson / Liam Martens

Delicacy / La délicatesse

Delicacy is a romantic comedy based on David Foenkinos’s bestselling novel of the same name. David directs the film with his brother, Stéphane Foenkinos. The film stars famous French actress Audrey Tautou as a Parisian executive whose perfect life falls apart when her handsome husband is killed in a traffic accident. After three years, she unexpectedly falls for an awkward, middle-aged, balding Swede who works for her. While it may seem somewhat implausible that she would go for him, like most Audrey Tautou films, Delicacy is quirky and hard not to love.

The sunshine hitting a stone building in Paris (left). A poster for the French Netflix movie 'Delicacy' with a photo of Audrey Tautou and the Eiffel Tower  (right).
Zach Dyson / Delicacy

Declaration of War / La guerre est déclarée

Declaration of War is a drama about a young couple, fatefully named Roméo and Juliette who learn that their young son has a brain tumor. The film is based on the real-life events of its director, Valérie Donzelli, and her then-partner Jérémie Elkaïm. Together, they wrote and star in the film. The greatness of this film lies in the fact that, despite the heavy subject matter, it is an “undoubtable force of happiness” (Le Monde).

The reflection of a Parisian stone building in a puddle (left). The view of a street lined by honey-colored stone buildings in Paris through an open window (right).
Mourad Saadi / Thibault Penin

To Each, Her Own / Les goûts et les couleurs

To Each, Her Own is a romantic comedy about Simone, a young woman from a conservative Jewish family who believes she’s a lesbian and has a secret girlfriend. But, just as she’s about to come out to her family, she finds herself attracted to a man. The film follows Simone’s confusing and difficult quest to understand her sexuality while also exploring issues such as religion, race, and family, all in a light tone. 

An aerial view of a tree-lined street in Paris under a purple sky as the sun sets (left). A man sitting on a stone bench by the River Seine (right).

Blind Date / Un peu, beaucoup, aveuglément 

Blind Date is a romantic comedy about a reclusive puzzle maker whose treasured silence is disrupted when a passionate pianist who can’t live without music moves into the apartment next door.

A still from the film 'Blind Date' with two women having drinks at the counter of a bar and chatting.
Blind Date

This cute and quirky film follows the two as they struggle to coexist on either side of their adjoining wall. Eventually a relationship develops, despite the fact they have never seen each other, proving that opposites do in fact attract.

Stay tuned for our round-up on Netflix series for francophiles.

A night street scene in Paris of neon shop signs lining on empty street.

Written by Ali Postma for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation rental in Paris, France or Italy. Looking to rent long-term or buy in France or Italy? Ask us! We can connect you to our trusted providers for amazing service and rates.

The post Our Favorite Netflix Movies For Learning French appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

This content was originally published here.

Categories
spanish

Mike Patton Joins S.O.D. Members To Perform ‘Speak Spanish Or Die’ While In Quarantine – The Beast | Metal Devastation Radio

A month after sharing “quarantine versions” of the   STORMTROOPERS OF DEATH   songs   “March Of The S.O.D.”   and   “Chromatic Death” , recorded with each member separated in their own homes,   Charlie Benante   ( ANTHRAX ),   Scott Ian   ( ANTHRAX ) and   Dan Lilker   ( NUCLEAR ASSAULT , ex- ANTHRAX ) have returned with another   S.O.D.   track,   “Speak English Or Die” , the lyrics of which have been switched up to   “Speak Spanish Or Die” . Joining the trio on vocals is   MR. BUNGLE   and   FAITH NO MORE   singer   Mike Patton , who previously performed the same track with   Ian   and ex- SLAYER   drummer   Dave Lombardo   at the   MR. BUNGLE   reunion shows in February.   Patton   makes an appearance in the accompanying video as “ The Lonely Rager ,” complete with cowboy hat and bandana mask.

STORMTROOPERS OF DEATH   (a.k.a.   S.O.D. ) was a satirical 1980s metal band which consisted of   Ian   (guitar),   Benante   (drums),   Lilker   (bass) and   M.O.D. ‘s   Billy Milano   (vocals).

STORMTROOPERS OF DEATH   are commonly credited as being among the first bands to fuse hardcore punk with thrash metal into a style sometimes called “crossover thrash.” The track   “March Of The S.O.D.”   from the group’s debut LP,   “Speak English Or Die” , was the   “Headbangers Ball”   intro song for many years.

STORMTROOPERS OF DEATH   was formed shortly after   Ian   finished his guitar tracks on the   ANTHRAX   album   “Spreading The Disease” . He would draw pictures of the face of a character known as “ Sargent D ,” and the pictures would be accompanied by slogans such as “I’m not racist; I hate everyone” and “Speak English Or Die.”   Ian   would then wrote lyrics about this character. He decided to form a hardcore band based on   Sargent D , so he recruited   Benante ,   Lilker   and   Milano .

The 30th-anniversary edition of   “Speak English Or Die”   was made available in November 2015 via   Megaforce . The set included the original album as well as the demo recordings from the pre- STROMTROOPERS OF DEATH   project   CRAB SOCIETY NORTH .

This content was originally published here.

Categories
english

Learn English with the News – Italy’s PM Gives New Lockdown Measures

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Italy’s PM Gives New Lockdown Measures – Definition Match

Sommario

di 13 domande completate

Domande:

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. 10
  11. 11
  12. 12
  13. 13

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Hai già completato il quiz pertanto non puoi rifarlo.

Il quiz si sta caricando…

Devi iscriverti o registrarti per iniziare il quiz.

Bisogna completare il seguente quiz per poter avviare questo quiz:

Risultati

di domande risposte correttamente

Il tuo tempo:

Il tempo è scaduto

Hai raggiunto di punti, ()

Categorie

  • Nice work! Did you get the result you were expecting? If not, feel free to take the quiz a second time!

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. 10
  11. 11
  12. 12
  13. 13
  1. Risposta

  2. Controlla

  1. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  2. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  3. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  4. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  5. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  6. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  7. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  8. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  9. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  10. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  11. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  12. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  13. . Domanda

    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



Italy’s PM Gives New Lockdown Measures – Fill in the Blank

Sommario

di 1 domande completate

Domande:

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Hai già completato il quiz pertanto non puoi rifarlo.

Il quiz si sta caricando…

Devi iscriverti o registrarti per iniziare il quiz.

Bisogna completare il seguente quiz per poter avviare questo quiz:

Risultati

di domande risposte correttamente

Il tuo tempo:

Il tempo è scaduto

Hai raggiunto di punti, ()

Categorie

  • Nice work! Did you get the result you were expecting? If not, feel free to take the quiz a second time!

  1. Risposta

  2. Controlla

  1. . Domanda

    BAN – BEHIND CLOSED DOORS – CAUTIOUS – CLERGY – IRREVERSIBLE – OUTBREAK – SPREAD – ALLOWED – CAP – EASE – OUTLINED – RESUMING – URGED

    • Italy has (outlined) plans to (ease) the restrictions it imposed seven weeks ago to reduce the (spread) of the coronavirus. Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said the measures would be relaxed from 4 May 2020, with people being (allowed) to visit their relatives in small numbers.
      Parks, factories and building sites will reopen, but schools will not restart classes until September. (Clergy) have written to Mr Conte to protest against the continued ban on church services.
      It comes as the country recorded its lowest number of new confirmed cases since the (outbreak) began. Authorities now believe the contagion rate is low enough to justify a (cautious) change of security measures.
      There was no announcement on the possibility of Italy’s premier football league Serie A (resuming), even (behind closed doors).
      Mr Conte stressed that social distancing measures would need to continue for months to come, and said church services would remain banned. He (urged) people to stay a metre (3ft) away from each other.
      “If we do not respect the safety measures, the curve will go up, the deaths will increase, and we will have (irreversible) damage to our economy,” the prime minister said. “If you love Italy, keep your distance.”
      He also said his government would (cap) the price of face masks at 50 cents ($0.54; £0.44).


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



Italy’s PM Gives New Lockdown Measures – True or False

Sommario

di 5 domande completate

Domande:

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

Hai già completato il quiz pertanto non puoi rifarlo.

Il quiz si sta caricando…

Devi iscriverti o registrarti per iniziare il quiz.

Bisogna completare il seguente quiz per poter avviare questo quiz:

Risultati

di domande risposte correttamente

Il tuo tempo:

Il tempo è scaduto

Hai raggiunto di punti, ()

Categorie

  • Nice work! Did you get the result you were expecting? If not, feel free to take the quiz a second time!

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  1. Risposta

  2. Controlla

  1. . Domanda

    Starting on May 4th 2020 Italy will have new anti-coronavirus measures.


    Corretto

    Well done, my friend!


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  2. . Domanda

    All organizations will reopen on May 4th.


    Corretto

    Well done, my friend!


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  3. . Domanda

    Italy’s coronavirus cases are decreasing.


    Corretto

    Well done, my friend!


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  4. . Domanda

    The football league will continue behind closed doors.


    Corretto

    Well done, my friend!


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



  5. . Domanda

    Masks have a recommended price of €0.50.


    Corretto

    Well done, my friend!


    Non corretto

    Not quite, better luck next time!



And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

This content was originally published here.